Mouse LRIG1 Antibody

Catalog # Availability Size / Price Qty
AF3688
AF3688-SP
Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Western Blot.
8 Images
Product Details
Citations (34)
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Mouse LRIG1 Antibody Summary

Species Reactivity
Mouse
Specificity
Detects mouse LRIG1 in direct ELISAs and Western blots. In direct ELISAs, less than 10% cross-reactivity with recombinant human (rh) LRIG1 is observed and less than 5% cross-reactivity with rhLRIG3 is observed.
Source
Polyclonal Goat IgG
Purification
Antigen Affinity-purified
Immunogen
Mouse myeloma cell line NS0-derived recombinant mouse LRIG1
Ala37-Thr794
Accession # P70193
Formulation
Lyophilized from a 0.2 μm filtered solution in PBS with Trehalose. *Small pack size (SP) is supplied either lyophilized or as a 0.2 µm filtered solution in PBS.
Label
Unconjugated

Applications

Recommended Concentration
Sample
Western Blot
2 µg/mL
See below
Flow Cytometry
0.25 µg/106 cells
See below
CyTOF-ready
Ready to be labeled using established conjugation methods. No BSA or other carrier proteins that could interfere with conjugation.
 
Immunocytochemistry
5-15 µg/mL
See below

Please Note: Optimal dilutions should be determined by each laboratory for each application. General Protocols are available in the Technical Information section on our website.

Scientific Data

Western Blot Detection of Mouse LRIG1 antibody by Western Blot. View Larger

Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Western Blot. Western blot shows lysates of bEnd.3 mouse endothelioma cell line untreated (-), treated (+) or mock treated (m) with 30 pmol mouse LRIG1 or mouse ERK1 siRNA. PVDF membrane was probed with 2 µg/mL of Goat Anti-Mouse LRIG1 Antigen Affinity-purified Polyclonal Antibody (Catalog # AF3688) followed by HRP-conjugated Anti-Goat IgG Secondary Antibody (Catalog # HAF109). Specific bands were detected for LRIG1 at approximately 140 kDa and 70 kDa (as indicated, upper panel). For additional reference ERK1 was detected using Rabbit Anti-Human/Mouse/Rat ERK1 Antigen Affinity-purified Polyclonal Antibody (lower panel, Catalog # AF1575) This experiment was conducted under reducing conditions and using Immunoblot Buffer Group 1.

Flow Cytometry Detection of LRIG1 antibody in bEnd.3 Mouse Cell Line antibody by Flow Cytometry. View Larger

Detection of LRIG1 in bEnd.3 Mouse Cell Line by Flow Cytometry. bEnd.3 mouse endothelioma cell line was stained with Goat Anti-Mouse LRIG1 Antigen Affinity-purified Polyclonal Antibody (Catalog # AF3688, filled histogram) or control antibody (Catalog # AB-108-C, open histogram), followed by Phycoerythrin-conjugated Anti-Goat IgG Secondary Antibody (Catalog # F0107).

Immunocytochemistry LRIG1 antibody in bEnd by Immunocytochemistry (ICC).3 Mouse Cell Line by Immunocytochemistry (ICC). View Larger

LRIG1 in bEnd.3 Mouse Cell Line. LRIG1 was detected in immersion fixed bEnd.3 mouse endothelioma cell line using Goat Anti-Mouse LRIG1 Antigen Affinity-purified Polyclonal Antibody (Catalog # AF3688) at 10 µg/mL for 3 hours at room temperature. Cells were stained using the NorthernLights™ 557-conjugated Anti-Goat IgG Secondary Antibody (red, upper panel; Catalog # NL001) and counterstained with DAPI (blue, lower panel). Specific staining was localized to cytoplasm. View our protocol for Fluorescent ICC Staining of Cells on Coverslips.

Immunohistochemistry Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunohistochemistry View Larger

Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunohistochemistry JunB expression during skin maturation and upon stress. a Representative microphotographs with double immunostaining for JunB (green) and FABP5 (red), indicative of sebaceous glands, in skin derived from 1, 3, and 5 days old mice. Inset showing magnified view of a sebaceous gland. Scale bars, 50 µm. b Immunostaining of JunB (green) and FABP5 (red) in 60 days old mice. Inset showing magnified view. c Representative microphotographs with double immunostaining of JunB (green) and FABP5 (red) in dorsal skin of 60 days old mice following hair plucking or d after topical TPA application, a potent inducer of proliferation. e Immunostaining of JunB (green) and LRIG1 or CD34 (red) in dorsal skin of 60 days old mice following hair plucking. f Immunostaining of JunB (green) and FABP5 (red) in adult human skin. E, epidermis; D, dermis; HF, hair follicle; SG, sebaceous gland; SD, sebaceous duct; HS, hair shaft. Asterisk indicates hair shaft autofluorescence. Dashed line indicates the epidermal-dermal junction. Scale bars, 50 µm Image collected and cropped by CiteAb from the following publication (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30143626), licensed under a CC-BY license. Not internally tested by R&D Systems.

Immunohistochemistry Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunohistochemistry View Larger

Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunohistochemistry Lrigs are co-expressed in the embryonic inner ear.(A) Diagram of the immature inner ear structure at E12.5 (left) and the mature structure at E16 (right), with schematic cross sections cut transverse to the ear at each age shown below. For the E16 cross section, the sensory epithelia are labeled red and the neurons green. In situs for Lrig1 (B) and X-gal staining for Lrig3-beta geo activity (C) show overlapping expression for Lrig1 and Lrig3 in the atrium (arrowhead) and the non-sensory domain of the cochlea. On the other hand, Lrig2-beta geo is active throughout the developing otic epithelium (D). c = cochlea, ed = endolymphatic duct, lp = lateral pouch, vp = vertical pouch. Scale bar = 50 µm. Image collected and cropped by CiteAb from the following publication (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24086156), licensed under a CC-BY license. Not internally tested by R&D Systems.

Immunocytochemistry/ Immunofluorescence Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence View Larger

Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence Lrig1 and Lrig2-beta geo are co-expressed in non-sensory tissues and in the vestibular ganglion.Transverse sections through Lrig2+/− tissue at E12.5 (A–C), E16.5 (D–G), and P15 (H–K) were double labeled with combinations of antibodies to Lrig1, beta -galactosidase (to detect Lrig2-beta geo), Sox2, and neurofilament (NF). (A) At E12.5, Lrig1 was detected in the atrium (bracket), while Lrig2-beta geo was present throughout the otic epithelium and surrounding mesenchyme (A″), overlapping with Lrig1 in the atrium (B). Within the atrium, Lrig1 was present in non-sensory tissues that flank Sox-2 positive sensory regions (arrowheads, C–C″). This expression was maintained at E16.5, with Lrig1 in the transitional epithelium adjacent to the utricular macula (arrowhead, D′) and in the extramacular epithelium of the saccule (arrowhead, F′), as well as in vestibular projections to the utricle and lateral crista (arrow, D′). Lrig2-beta geo, on the other hand, continued to be expressed broadly in both sensory and non-sensory portions of the vestibular organs at E16.5 (E′, G′). After the onset of hearing (P15), Lrig1 was expressed in NF-positive fibers innervating the utricular and saccular maculae (arrows, I, J), whereas Lrig2-beta geo was enriched in all vestibular sensory epithelia (I′,J′,K), which were recognized by the presence of NF labeled projections. c = crista, cd = cochlear duct, ed = endolymphatic duct, hb = hindbrain, lp = lateral pouch, sg = spiral ganglion, sm = saccular macula, um = utricular macule, vg = vestibular ganglion, vp = vertical pouch, VIIIV = vestibular division of the eighth cranial nerve. Scale bar = 40 µm. Image collected and cropped by CiteAb from the following publication (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24086156), licensed under a CC-BY license. Not internally tested by R&D Systems.

Immunocytochemistry/ Immunofluorescence Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence View Larger

Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence Lrig1 and Lrig2-beta geo are co-expressed in the non-sensory region of the cochlea.Transverse sections through Lrig2+/− tissue at E12.5 (A), E16.5 (B), and P15 (C) were double labeled with antibodies to Lrig1, beta -galactosidase, and NF. (A) At E12.5, staining was evident in the non-sensory region of the cochlear epithelium (asterisk) and the mesenchyme surrounding the spiral ganglion. (B) At E16.5, Lrig1 was detected in the medial wall of the cochlea, which will form the inner sulcus and Reissner's membrane (asterisk). (C) At P15, Lrig1 was found in the base of Reissner's membrane (asterisk), with localization to the cell surface (inset). In contrast, at E12.5 and 16.5, Lrig2-beta geo was found broadly in the cochlear epithelium and surrounding mesenchyme (A′–B′). At P15, expression was enriched in spiral ganglion neurons and in the organ of Corti (C′). cd = cochlear duct, m = mesenchyme, oC = organ of Corti, rm = Reissner's membrane, sg = spiral ganglion. Scale bar = 40 µm. Image collected and cropped by CiteAb from the following publication (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24086156), licensed under a CC-BY license. Not internally tested by R&D Systems.

Immunocytochemistry/ Immunofluorescence Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence View Larger

Detection of Mouse LRIG1 by Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence Association of Oct1 with normal somatic stem cells.A. IF images of cross-sections from grossly uninvolved colon margins of a male familial adenomatous polyposis patient. Frozen sections were stained with mouse anti-Oct1 antibodies (Millipore MAB5434) and co-stained with TO-PRO. Crypts are shown in cross-section. White dashed circle highlights a crypt. Arrows indicate cells staining strongly for Oct1. B. IF images of colon crypt sections from a normal male individual. Sections were stained with DAPI, and anti-Oct1 and anti-ALDH1a1 antibodies. Merged images are shown at right. White dashed lines highlight crypts. Examples of cells co-staining with Oct1 and ALDH1a1 are highlighted with yellow arrows. An example cell staining with ALDH1a1 only is highlighted with an asterisk. Inset at lower right-hand corner is a digital magnification of the central portion of the image. Sections were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded. C. Frozen mouse colon tissue sections were stained with DAPI, and anti-Lrig1 and anti-Oct1 antibodies. IF images of longitudinal sections are shown. White dashed lines highlight the crypt. D. IF images of mouse small intestine sections. Sections were stained with DAPI and anti-Oct1 antibodies. Merged images are shown at right. White dashed lines highlight a crypt. Inset at upper right-hand corner is a digital magnification of the central portion of the image. Sections were formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded. E. IF images of cross-sectional duodenum sections from a normal C57BL/6 mouse. Frozen sections were stained with DAPI and anti-Oct1 and anti-Lgr5 antibodies. Merged images are shown at right. Examples of co-staining cells are highlighted with yellow arrows. White dashed lines highlights crypts. F. Longitudinal sections. Image collected and cropped by CiteAb from the following publication (https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23144633), licensed under a CC-BY license. Not internally tested by R&D Systems.

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Preparation and Storage

Reconstitution
Reconstitute at 0.2 mg/mL in sterile PBS.
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Shipping
The product is shipped at ambient temperature. Upon receipt, store it immediately at the temperature recommended below. *Small pack size (SP) is shipped with polar packs. Upon receipt, store it immediately at -20 to -70 °C
Stability & Storage
Use a manual defrost freezer and avoid repeated freeze-thaw cycles.
  • 12 months from date of receipt, -20 to -70 °C as supplied.
  • 1 month, 2 to 8 °C under sterile conditions after reconstitution.
  • 6 months, -20 to -70 °C under sterile conditions after reconstitution.

Background: LRIG1

LRIG-1 (leucine-rich repeats and Ig-like domains-1; also LIG-1) is an approximately 130-145 kDa glycoprotein that belongs to the LRIG gene family.  It is widely expressed, and appears on the surface of prostatic epithelium, endothelial cells, vascular and visceral smooth muscle, mammary epithelium, cardiac muscle, keratinocytes and neurons.  LRIG-1 is believed to negatively regulate the ErbB family of receptors.  In particular, and in a ligand-independent manner, LRIG-1 complexes with all four ErbBs, promoting their ubiquitination and decreasing their number.  Alternatively, LRIG-1 is suggested to bind to the ErbBs, preventing their dimerization and signal transduction.  Mature mouse LRIG-1 is a 1057 amino acid (aa) type I transmembrane protein (SwissProt #:P70193).  It contains a large 762 amino acid (aa) extracellular domain (ECD) (aa 35-795) plus a 274 aa cytoplasmic region.  The ECD contains 17 LRRs (aa’s 35-491) and three C2-type Ig-like domains (aa’s 497-781).  These two domain types are each sufficient for EGFR binding.  There one potential alternative splice form that a deletion of aa 875-923.  The LRIG-1 ECD undergoes proteolysis, generating 90-105 and 60-70 kDa soluble fragments.  Over aa 37-794, human LRIG-1 shares 97% and 90% aa sequence identity with rat and human LRIG-1, respectively.

Long Name
Leucine-rich Repeats and Immunoglobulin-like Domains 1
Entrez Gene IDs
26018 (Human); 16206 (Mouse); 312574 (Rat)
Alternate Names
D6Bwg0781e; Img; LIG1; LIG-1; LRIG1

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Citations for Mouse LRIG1 Antibody

R&D Systems personnel manually curate a database that contains references using R&D Systems products. The data collected includes not only links to publications in PubMed, but also provides information about sample types, species, and experimental conditions.

34 Citations: Showing 1 - 10
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  1. In Vivo Analysis of Lrig Genes Reveals Redundant and Independent Functions in the Inner Ear
    Authors: Tony del Rio, Allison M. Nishitani, Wei-Ming Yu, Lisa V. Goodrich
    PLoS Genetics
  2. WNT10A mutation causes ectodermal dysplasia by impairing progenitor cell proliferation and KLF4-mediated differentiation
    Authors: M Xu, J Horrell, M Snitow, J Cui, H Gochnauer, CM Syrett, S Kallish, JT Seykora, F Liu, D Gaillard, JP Katz, KH Kaestner, B Levin, C Mansfield, JE Douglas, BJ Cowart, M Tordoff, F Liu, X Zhu, LA Barlow, AI Rubin, JA McGrath, EE Morrisey, EY Chu, SE Millar
    Nat Commun, 2017-06-07;8(0):15397.
  3. Mutant Lef1 controls Gata6 in sebaceous gland development and cancer
    Authors: Bénédicte Oulès, Emanuel Rognoni, Esther Hoste, Georgina Goss, Ryan Fiehler, Ken Natsuga et al.
    The EMBO Journal
  4. Basal Cell Carcinoma Preferentially Arises from Stem Cells within Hair Follicle and Mechanosensory Niches
    Authors: Shelby C. Peterson, Markus Eberl, Alicia N. Vagnozzi, Abdelmadjid Belkadi, Natalia A. Veniaminova, Monique E. Verhaegen et al.
    Cell Stem Cell
  5. Intersections between Regulated Cell Death and Autophagy
    Authors: Francesco Napoletano, Olga Baron, Peter Vandenabeele, Bertrand Mollereau, Manolis Fanto
    Trends in Cell Biology
  6. Tracheal separation is driven by NKX2-1-mediated repression of Efnb2 and regulation of endodermal cell sorting
    Authors: AE Lewis, A Kuwahara, J Franzosi, JO Bush
    Cell Reports, 2022-03-15;38(11):110510.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IF
  7. Cutaneous Effects of In Utero and Lactational Exposure of C57BL/6J Mice to 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
    Authors: J Bhuju, KM Olesen, CS Muenyi, TS Patel, RW Read, L Thompson, O Skalli, Q Zheng, EA Grice, CH Sutter, TR Sutter
    Toxics, 2021-08-20;9(8):.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  8. Lgr6 marks epidermal stem cells with a nerve-dependent role in wound re-epithelialization
    Authors: S Huang, P Kuri, Y Aubert, M Brewster, N Li, O Farrelly, G Rice, H Bae, S Prouty, T Dentchev, W Luo, BC Capell, P Rompolas
    Cell Stem Cell, 2021-06-07;0(0):.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  9. LRIG1-Mediated Inhibition of EGF Receptor Signaling Regulates Neural Precursor Cell Proliferation in the Neocortex
    Authors: D Jeong, D Lozano Cas, A Gengathara, K Edwards, A Saghatelya, DR Kaplan, FD Miller, SA Yuzwa
    Cell Rep, 2020-10-13;33(2):108257.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Cells, Whole Tissue
    Applications: ICC, IHC
  10. Delineating the early transcriptional specification of the mammalian trachea and esophagus
    Authors: A Kuwahara, AE Lewis, C Coombes, FS Leung, M Percharde, JO Bush
    Elife, 2020-06-09;9(0):.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  11. A single-progenitor model as the unifying paradigm of epidermal and esophageal epithelial maintenance in mice
    Authors: G Piedrafita, V Kostiou, A Wabik, B Colom, D Fernandez-, A Herms, K Murai, BA Hall, PH Jones
    Nat Commun, 2020-03-18;11(1):1429.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  12. The aging skin microenvironment dictates stem cell behavior
    Authors: Y Ge, Y Miao, S Gur-Cohen, N Gomez, H Yang, M Nikolova, L Polak, Y Hu, A Verma, O Elemento, JG Krueger, E Fuchs
    Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 2020-02-24;0(0):.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  13. Epidermal Tissue Adapts to Restrain Progenitors Carrying Clonal p53 Mutations
    Authors: K Murai, G Skrupskely, G Piedrafita, M Hall, V Kostiou, SH Ong, T Nagy, A Cagan, D Goulding, AM Klein, BA Hall, PH Jones
    Cell Stem Cell, 2018-09-27;0(0):.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  14. JunB defines functional and structural integrity of the epidermo-pilosebaceous unit in the skin
    Authors: K Singh, E Camera, L Krug, A Basu, RK Pandey, S Munir, M Wlaschek, S Kochanek, M Schorpp-Ki, M Picardo, P Angel, C Niemann, P Maity, K Scharffett
    Nat Commun, 2018-08-24;9(1):3425.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC-P
  15. YAP/TAZ-Dependent Reprogramming of Colonic Epithelium Links ECM Remodeling to Tissue Regeneration
    Authors: S Yui, L Azzolin, M Maimets, MT Pedersen, RP Fordham, SL Hansen, HL Larsen, J Guiu, MRP Alves, CF Rundsten, JV Johansen, Y Li, CD Madsen, T Nakamura, M Watanabe, OH Nielsen, PJ Schweiger, S Piccolo, KB Jensen
    Cell Stem Cell, 2017-12-14;22(1):35-49.e7.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  16. Secretory phospholipase A2-IIA overexpressing mice exhibit cyclic alopecia mediated through aberrant hair shaft differentiation and impaired wound healing response
    Authors: GL Chovatiya, RM Sarate, RR Sunkara, NP Gawas, V Kala, SK Waghmare
    Sci Rep, 2017-09-14;7(1):11619.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  17. Stem cell plasticity enables hair regeneration following Lgr5(+) cell loss
    Authors: JD Hoeck, B Biehs, AV Kurtova, NM Kljavin, F de Sousa E, B Alicke, H Koeppen, Z Modrusan, R Piskol, FJ de Sauvage
    Nat. Cell Biol., 2017-05-29;19(6):666-676.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  18. Stem Cell Lineage Infidelity Drives Wound Repair and Cancer
    Authors: Y Ge, NC Gomez, RC Adam, M Nikolova, H Yang, A Verma, CP Lu, L Polak, S Yuan, O Elemento, E Fuchs
    Cell, 2017-04-20;0(0):.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  19. Interfering with stem cell-specific gatekeeper functions controls tumour initiation and malignant progression of skin tumours.
    Authors: Petersson, Monika, Reuter, Karen, Brylka, Heike, Kraus, Andreas, Schettina, Peter, Niemann, Catherin
    Nat Commun, 2015-01-22;6(0):5874.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  20. GPR39 marks specific cells within the sebaceous gland and contributes to skin wound healing.
    Authors: Zhao, Huashan, Qiao, Jingqiao, Zhang, Shoubing, Zhang, Huishan, Lei, Xiaohua, Wang, Xinyue, Deng, Zhili, Ning, Lina, Cao, Yujing, Guo, Yong, Liu, Shuang, Duan, Enkui
    Sci Rep, 2015-01-21;5(0):7913.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC-Fr
  21. Overexpression of epigen during embryonic development induces reversible, epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent sebaceous gland hyperplasia.
    Authors: Dahlhoff M, Frances D, Kloepper J, Paus R, Schafer M, Niemann C, Schneider M
    Mol Cell Biol, 2014-06-02;34(16):3086-95.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC-Fr
  22. Kindlin-1 controls Wnt and TGF-beta availability to regulate cutaneous stem cell proliferation.
    Authors: Rognoni E, Widmaier M, Jakobson M, Ruppert R, Ussar S, Katsougkri D, Bottcher R, Lai-Cheong J, Rifkin D, McGrath J, Fassler R
    Nat Med, 2014-03-30;20(4):350-9.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC, IHC-P
  23. Distinct fibroblast lineages determine dermal architecture in skin development and repair.
    Authors: Driskell R, Lichtenberger B, Hoste E, Kretzschmar K, Simons B, Charalambous M, Ferron S, Herault Y, Pavlovic G, Ferguson-Smith A, Watt F
    Nature, 2013-12-12;504(7479):277-81.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC-Fr
  24. Transcription factor Oct1 is a somatic and cancer stem cell determinant.
    Authors: Maddox, Jessica, Shakya, Arvind, South, Samuel, Shelton, Dawne, Andersen, Jared N, Chidester, Stephani, Kang, Jinsuk, Gligorich, Keith M, Jones, David A, Spangrude, Gerald J, Welm, Bryan E, Tantin, Dean
    PLoS Genet, 2012-11-08;8(11):e1003048.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC-Fr
  25. Lrig1 controls intestinal stem-cell homeostasis by negative regulation of ErbB signalling.
    Authors: Wong, Vivian W, Stange, Daniel E, Page, Mahalia, Buczacki, Simon, Wabik, Agnieszk, Itami, Satoshi, van de Wetering, Marc, Poulsom, Richard, Wright, Nicholas, Trotter, Matthew, Watt, Fiona M, Winton, Doug J, Clevers, Hans, Jensen, Kim B
    Nat Cell Biol, 2012-03-04;14(4):401-8.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC-P
  26. Delayed cutaneous wound healing and aberrant expression of hair follicle stem cell markers in mice selectively lacking Ctip2 in epidermis.
    Authors: Liang X, Bhattacharya S, Bajaj G
    PLoS ONE, 2012-02-21;7(2):e29999.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC
  27. TCF/Lef1 activity controls establishment of diverse stem and progenitor cell compartments in mouse epidermis.
    Authors: Petersson M, Brylka H, Kraus A
    EMBO J., 2011-06-21;30(15):3004-18.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Cells
    Applications: Flow Cytometry
  28. Assaying proliferation and differentiation capacity of stem cells using disaggregated adult mouse epidermis.
    Authors: Jensen KB, Driskell RR, Watt FM
    Nat Protoc, 2010-04-22;5(5):898-911.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Cells
    Applications: Flow Cytometry
  29. Differential sensitivity of epidermal cell subpopulations to beta-catenin-induced ectopic hair follicle formation.
    Authors: Baker CM, Verstuyf A, Jensen KB
    Dev. Biol., 2010-04-14;343(1):40-50.
    Species: Mouse
    Sample Types: Whole Tissue
    Applications: IHC-Fr
  30. Astrocyte-neuron crosstalk through Hedgehog signaling mediates cortical synapse development
    Authors: Y Xie, AT Kuan, W Wang, ZT Herbert, O Mosto, O Olukoya, M Adam, S Vu, M Kim, D Tran, N Gómez, C Charpentie, I Sorour, TE Lacey, MY Tolstoruko, BL Sabatini, WA Lee, CC Harwell
    Cell Reports, 2022-02-22;38(8):110416.
  31. Niche-Specific Factors Dynamically Regulate Sebaceous Gland Stem Cells in the Skin
    Authors: Natalia A. Veniaminova, Marina Grachtchouk, Owen J. Doane, Jamie K. Peterson, David A. Quigley, Madison V. Lull et al.
    Developmental Cell
  32. Using a new Lrig1 reporter mouse to assess differences between two Lrig1 antibodies in the intestine
    Authors: Emily J. Poulin, Anne E. Powell, Yang Wang, Yina Li, Jeffrey L. Franklin, Robert J. Coffey
    Stem Cell Research
  33. Dermal EZH2 orchestrates dermal differentiation and epidermal proliferation during murine skin development
    Authors: Venkata Thulabandu, Timothy Nehila, James W. Ferguson, Radhika P. Atit
    Developmental Biology
  34. Differential toxicity to murine small and large intestinal epithelium induced by oncology drugs
    Authors: Jake M. Bieber, Laura E. Sanman, Xiaoxiao Sun, Heinz Hammerlindl, Feng Bao, Maike A. Roth et al.
    Communications Biology

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