Ubiquitination Cascade Pathway

Click on one of the buttons below to explore the ubiquitination process and the different types of ubiquitination that can be generated.

Ubiquitin
Ubiquitin
ProductsClose
E1
E1
E1
E1
E2
E2
E2
E2
E3
E3
E3
E3
Substrate
Substrate
Monoubiquitination
Monoubiquitination
Multi-monoubiquitination
Multi-monoubiquitination
K6-linked
K6-linked
ProductsClose
DUB
DUB
ProductsClose
K11-linked
K11-linked
DUB
DUB
K27-linked
K27-linked
ProductsClose
DUB
DUB
ProductsClose
K29-linked
K29-linked
DUB
DUB
K33-linked
K33-linked
DUB
DUB
K48-linked
K48-linked
DUB
DUB
K63-linked
K63-linked
DUB
DUB
Met1-linked
(linear)
Met1-linked
(linear)
DUB
DUB
Polyubiquitin
Polyubiquitin
ER stress-mediated apoptosis
Lysosomal degradation
mRNP disassembly
Wnt/beta-Catenin signaling
ER stress-mediated apoptosis
Lysosomal degradation
mRNP disassembly
Wnt/beta-Catenin signaling
Antiviral immunity
Mitochondrial transport
TGF-beta signaling
Ubiquitin fusion degradation
Antiviral immunity
Mitochondrial transport
TGF-beta signaling
Ubiquitin fusion degradation
Cell cycle
ERAD
Hedgehog signaling
TNF RI signaling
Cell cycle
ERAD
Hedgehog signaling
TNF RI signaling
DNA repair
Histone modification
Cell cycle
DNA repair
Histone modification
Cell cycle
Protein trafficking
TCR signaling
Protein trafficking
TCR signaling
Proteasomal degradation
TLR2/4 signaling
TCR signaling
Transcription regulation
Proteasomal degradation
TLR2/4 signaling
TCR signaling
Transcription regulation
Autophagy
Development
DNA replication and repair
Innate and adaptive immunity
Neurodegeneration
Signal transduction
Spliceosome function
Autophagy
Development
DNA replication and repair
Innate and adaptive immunity
Neurodegeneration
Signal transduction
Spliceosome function
Immunity
Immunity
DNA replication and repair
Endocytosis
Signal transduction
Protein localization
Transcription regulation
DNA replication and repair
Endocytosis
Signal transduction
Protein localization
Transcription regulation
Endocytosis
Signal transduction
Protein localization
Endocytosis
Signal transduction
Protein localization
PPi + AMP
PPi + AMP
ATP
ATP

Overview of Ubiquitination Cascade

Ubiquitin is a highly conserved globular 76-residue eukaryotic protein found in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cells. Ubiquitin can be covalently attached (conjugated) to proteins in a process termed ubiquitination that utilizes Ubiquitin-activating (E1), Ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) and Ubiquitin Ligase (E3) enzymes. Ubiquitination affects protein stability, subcellular localization, and the ability to interact with other proteins. Ubiquitin can be attached to substrate proteins in three different manners: monoubiquitination, multi-monoubiquitination, and polyubiquitination. Eight residues within ubiquitin can be utilized to form polyubiquitin chains [K6, K11, K27, K29, K33, K48, K63, and Met1 (linear)] and linkage type directs the modified proteins to different cellular fates. Polyubiquitin chains of all linkages listed above have been detected in vivo and have been shown to differentially affect many cellular processes, signaling pathways, and disease states. Boston Biochem reagents allow you to discover if a protein of interest is ubiquitinated and investigate how ubiquitination affects the function of that protein.

To learn more, please visit our Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-like Modifiers Research Area.

Ubiquitination Cascade Pathway background image 1Ubiquitination Cascade Pathway background image 2Ubiquitination Cascade Pathway background image 3Ubiquitination Cascade Pathway background image 4